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Content on this website will be posted primarily in English. Content in French or Aboriginal languages will be posted when available. We apologize for this inconvenience.

Browse or search through the Active Circle database to find resources about Aboriginal youth sports and recreation.

The Active Circle resource database contains information gathered from organizations across Canada who research and engage in Aboriginal sports, activities for youth and healthy living.

It is important to understand youth engagement as central to any best practice intervention.  Valuing youth engagement puts the focus on the positive contribution that youth make to programs and their effectiveness; this moves programs from being done “for” youth to “with” youth. There is a gap in the research in how to identify the source and implications of youth vulnerability for their engagement (Paterson & Panessa, 2008a; Poland, Tupker, & Breland, 2002). The purpose of this report is to explore how different youth engagement strategies are being used to help children and youth in the most challenging of contexts nurture resilience, prevent mental health problems and build a special place for themselves in the collective life of their communities.

Download the full report here

Read more here

Canadian Sport for Life is proud to announce that the PLAY tools have been printed and are available for order. Created by Dr. Dean Kriellaars of the University of Manitoba and developed by Canadian Sport for Life, the (PLAY) tools are designed to assess a child’s level of physical literacy and improve the health of our nation. Directed at individuals aged seven and up, the PLAY tools provide a means to determine gaps in physical literacy development, and provide calls-to-action to help improve these areas.

The Canadian Association for the Advancement of Women and Sport and Physical Activity (CAAWS), along with its partners AthletesCAN and Coaches of Canada, launched Leading the Way: Working with LGBT Athletes and Coaches.

This brochure describes eight ways parks improves our health, such as providing a place for encouraging exercise, including individual and supervised activities, mental and physical health benefits, and more.

Directed at individuals aged seven and up, the PLAY Tools determine gaps in physical literacy development, and provide calls-to-action to help improve these areas.

Physical Literacy and FIFA Women’s World Cup™

There is strong evidence indicating that outdoor recreation as well as simply being present in a natural setting improve physical health.

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